Black Cover

Black Cover header image 2

Awesome Notebook Exhibit in New York City! Go now!

January 27th, 2011 · 11 Comments · Uncategorized


For all you notebook lovers out there, the Morgan Library in New York City is running a special exhibition that shouldn’t be missed.

http://www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/images/current/hawthorne-sophia.jpg

On display through May 22, 2011, the Morgan has pulled an incredible array of historical notebooks, from such figures as Charlotte Bronte, Albert Einstein, Bob Dylan and John Steinbeck. Leatherbound, spiral, enormous, unbelievably tiny, the exhibit drives home the point that the perfect notebook means something different to everyone.

Also on display are examples of notebooks sold through the ages, including a small notepad from the 1600′s with “erasable pages” – paper that was covered in a waxy surface that could be removed by rubbing with a cloth.

The exhibit only fills one room, but is definitely worth it if you’re willing to take time to appreciate each one.

Tags:

11 responses so far ↓

  • 1 links for 2011-01-28 « Unjustly // Jan 28, 2011 at 7:31 am

    [...] Awesome Notebook Exhibit in New York City! Go now! For all you notebook lovers out there, the Morgan Library in New York City is running a special exhibition that shouldn’t be missed. On display through May 22, 2011, the Morgan has pulled an incredible array of historical notebooks, from such figures as Charlotte Bronte, Albert Einstein, Bob Dylan and John Steinbeck. Leatherbound, spiral, enormous, unbelievably tiny, the exhibit drives home the point that the perfect notebook means something different to everyone. Also on display are examples of notebooks sold through the ages, including a small notepad from the 1600′s with “erasable pages” – paper that was covered in a waxy surface that could be removed by rubbing with a cloth. The exhibit only fills one room, but is definitely worth it if you’re willing to take time to appreciate each one. (tags: notetaking museum moleskine) [...]

  • 2 Stuart // Jan 28, 2011 at 9:05 am

    Welcome back!

  • 3 Simon // Jan 31, 2011 at 9:00 pm

    Yesss! Welcome back! Can we look forward to updates? :O

  • 4 jlshall (Joy's Blog) // Feb 2, 2011 at 1:55 pm

    The exhibit, or at least part of it, is also online at the Morgan’s website (themorgan.org). You can see several of the diaries and download an audio guide – which I haven’t done yet.

    Just discovered your excellent blog!

  • 5 Jonathan // Feb 8, 2011 at 6:00 am

    It’s good to see you back. I hope this isn’t a glimmer, but a full return to writing your blog on a regular basis. Cheers!

  • 6 kate shrewsday // Feb 11, 2011 at 12:47 am

    Brilliant article, thanks – I’m a notebook junkie. Have put a link on my sire – hope that’s ok :-)

  • 7 kate shrewsday // Feb 11, 2011 at 12:48 am

    Site, sorry, site!!!

  • 8 blogresipi // Feb 16, 2011 at 12:31 pm

    Yeah, welcome back! A silent reader of your blog. It did inspire me to look out for Midori traveler’s notebook for my travel companion.

  • 9 Jack // Feb 28, 2011 at 3:56 am

    I do enjoy your comment on the notebook, please update more. Thanks!

  • 10 Heatherface // Dec 23, 2011 at 2:23 pm

    This hasn’t been updated in a while but I’m hoping you get notifications to new comments.

    Why isn’t there a Search feature? I came to try and find the difference between two Moleskines, but it looks like I’m going to have to use Google as a roundabout way to search this site. This blog is definitely missing a few features, are you still working on it or has it been abandoned? I’d be happy to help if you’d like, if you just don’t have the time.

  • 11 david bogie // Jan 8, 2012 at 8:25 am

    If history is any indication, we’re about due for your once-a-year post.
    Hope life is interesting and productive for you and I want to say, once again, thanks for the effort you put into this blog a coupe of years ago. I’m not entirely sure but your review procedures may have set the standard for everyone else who has posted critiques of little notebooks. That’s a cool legacy.

Leave a Comment